Frequently Asked Questions

  • Q.

    How can I clean my rotary airlock valve faster?

    A.

    Rotary valves built on a rail system are specifically designed for faster cleaning, because you don’t need tools or a lot of effort to open up the valve and access the internal housing. The ACS Valves model is called the Quick-Clean, and it’s designed to help you clean up in just a few minutes. You could also add a U-shaped rotor, which has round pockets to prevent stubborn material buildup.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    Are there rotary airlock valves for split-feed conveying lines?

    A.

    Definitely. If you have one conveying line that splits into two, you could try the unique Multi-Port Valve, which has multiple compartments in one trough-style housing. Another option is a plug-type diverter valve, which diverts material into one of two possible feeds.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    How do I configure a rotary airlock valve?

    A.

    You can configure valves with specialized coatings, rotors, accessories and additional conveying equipment. A rotary valve expert can tell you which of these you actually need, and which will take your conveying efficiency to the next level.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    What type of rotary airlock valve should I choose?

    A.

    We have dozens of rotary valves available for all industries, applications, ingredients, system types and any other details that affect your conveying process. For a customized answer, a rotary valve expert is the best person to ask.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    How do I choose rotary airlock valve accessories?

    A.

    It depends on your application and what you need them for – safety, material flow, overall efficiency? Our rotary valve accessory guide breaks it all down.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    How are rotary airlock valves sized?

    A.

    Our team sizes rotary valves based on several factors such as material characteristics, system configuration and application. There’s a quick and easy way to do it yourself, though – check out our Rotary Valve Sizing Tool.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    How do I replace a rotary airlock valve?

    A.

    It’s simple, really – just ask. ACS Valves can replace a valve from any manufacturer, whether you need a fast drop-in replacement or something with all the bells and whistles.

    For more details, we have a whole blog about the replacement process.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    I’m ordering a valve from the U.S. Do I need to worry about border delays or additional fees?

    A.

    Absolutely not! ACS is fully bonded, and we’re partnered with a company that picks up shipments daily. For you, that means no delays, customs duties or brokerage fees.

    Posted by ACS Valves
  • Q.

    Why do we recommend a shear protector for pellets, flakes or beads?

    A.

    Shear protectors reduce the flow of material at the valve's inlet. Reduced flow allows for better pocket fill and also reduces the risk of product jams in your housing clearances–ultimately protecting your product from damage.

    Posted by Terri Shipstone
  • Q.

    Why use a shear pin sprocket with sawdust or wood fines?

    A.

    Sometimes the rotation of the rotor is reduced due to an overload of material, or larger pieces of material being fed through the valve, jamming in the clearances. In this case, shear pin sprockets will shear the pin on the sprocket, reducing the risk of damage to the rotor.

    Posted by Terri Shipstone
  • Q.

    My valve is losing too much air, what could be the problem?

    A.

    Too much clearance between the rotor, endplates and or housing can result in air loss. Measure the rotor to endplate and rotor to housing clearances to confirm that they are an NFPA compliant 0.0079 inches. If the clearance is larger than this, it might be time to replace your rotor, rotary valve, or have it sent back to ACS for a repair or evaluation. Make sure to stick to a maintenance schedule and check your clearances at least every three months.

    Posted by Nena Dallas
  • Q.

    What is this capped pipe that is sticking out of the side of my valve?

    A.

    The capped pipe is called a housing vent port. Rotor pockets can sometimes contain a volume of pressured air, which can impede material flow into the airlock inlet, reducing your efficiency. Also, in conveying systems that run at 6 PSI and higher, large releases of air up the return side of the airlock can cause pulsing in the material flow into the conveying line. Using a vent helps solve both of these issues, and is also helpful in improving your fill efficiency.

    Posted by ACS Valves